Grassroots Global Justice Alliance

Many struggles, one movement

At the Venezuelan Social Pre-COP: Reflections by Diana Lopez

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The International Preparatory Meeting for the Social PreCOP on Climate Change taking
place July 15 to July 18 will basically discuss the effects and causes of climate change but mainly its to create solutions though unity and education. Social Movements and the Venezuelan Government are coming together in Venezuela for a preparatory meeting in anticipation of the Social PreCOP happening in November. The meeting takes place on La Isla Margarita, which is part of Venesuelas Nueva Esparta state. Nueva Esparta means New Sparta, it was named after the Revolution for independence when native islanders fought until death, like Spartans, for liberation from the Spanish. La Isla is also where Fidel Castro and Hugo Chavez converged on ALBA to unite the Caribbean and Latino America.

As US organizers prepare for the UN Climate Meeting in New York City this September this meeting comes together at a critical moment within the international movement for climate justice. Going back to the past four UNFCCC there has been great push against binding agreements that would force the worlds worse polluters to cut emissions. China, Canada and the US are among the countries that attempt to dominate the landscape in oder to continue extracting resources. Going back even further the US Government has played a key role in colonizing the economic and social structures of Latino America and Caribbean countries. Thus we go into this meeting with a deep analysis of our own country which also continues to create systemic structures that keep poor people, people of color from reaching justice.

Within in official UN international spaces there is always a lack of representation from the people most affected by climate change. Grassroots organizations/ civil society brings the solutions and understanding of how to live well in connection with mother earth. Venezuela sees the need to have civil society and youth present during meetings which is why there is a strong presence from Latino America’s base building organizations. However the reality is that there is a global south within the global north that is being left out of many international spaces. There is a strong force of people taking on climate change at the local level, building community owned energy, creating intergenerational community planning, and connecting the need to not only fight for environmental justice but also to address the economy, reproductive issues and governance.

Coming into this meeting there are may thoughts and questions that link our work and understanding of political and social movements.

  1. To begin there is a long political history around liberation and independence in Latino America that shifts the way conversations are developed and who is part of the discussion. We understand that power comes from the base, from people of color, farmers, women, indigenous community, and youth that have traditionally been left out of decision making space within the US and international spaces. Knowing the struggle and how the US has played a part of those movements is critical to building international relationships and developing united solutions that have systems change at the center. In general the GGJ delegation is looking to to deepen understanding among international allies of the ways that people of color, poor folks and Indigenous communities are negatively impacted by U.S.-led domestic and international policies and practices.
  2. Building relationships and solidarity movements are necessary to break down systems that keep oppressing our people. One of goals of the GGJ delegation is to deepen relationships with national and international groups who demonstrate understanding of the intersection between capitalism, ecology and justice and that work to address the causes and impacts of climate change.

Submitted by Diana Lopez, Executive Director, Southwest Workers Union

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